Your web browser is out of date. Update your browser for more security, speed and the best experience on this site.
Find out more
We use cookies and similar technologies to optimise your experience when using this site, to help us understand site usage, and to tailor our advertising on third party sites. Read about Cookies and view our Privacy Policy at the bottom of each page on our website at any time.
Comet Neowise By Eye
CREDIT: Alan Hodgson ASIS HonFRPS

Why I do photography

Seeing my unseen

We all have different reasons for doing photography. Sometimes it is to record something that is important to us, such as a family occasion. These are all the more important if you cannot for any reason witness the event and the image is all you have in the way of participation.

An example came my way just before midnight on the 19th July. I used to work in astrophotography and I enjoy twilight photography. Like the rest of the astronomy community I was excited to hear that Comet Neowise was turning out to be a spectacular object and an easy naked eye visible object to witness just after dark.

My difficulty is that what is visible to the average eye in twilight is inaccessible to me. Photography, particularly in the era of digital "live view" is my route to seeing my unseen. So out of the hundreds of more detailed images I have taken of Comet Neowise this is my most important.

I chose a field of view to closely resemble the naked eye and an exposure level that best reflects my impression of a NW horizon shortly after sunset to a dark adapted eye. Seeing my unseen is one of the reasons I do photography.

 

Nikon D750 at ISO1250 and 1 second exposure. Nikkor 50mm lens at f/1.4. No image adjustments. The 4 bright stars are the "bowl" of the Big Dipper (Ursa Major). Comet Neowise is in the bottom right corner, "seen" on the evening of 19th July.