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CREDIT: Mike Lloyd ARPS

Mike Lloyd ARPS Distinction

Previously published in the RPS Landscape Magazine, Spring 2020

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CREDIT: Mike Lloyd ARPS
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M R Lloyd - ARPS Statement of Intent

 

Delamere – A changing Forest

I have always been excited by the challenge of making compositions that create some form of order from within the inherent disorder of this local forest.

Recent tree felling and flooding of old wetlands is now creating an exciting new set of photographic opportunities throughout the seasons.

I have tried to emphasise the feeling of being enveloped within the woodland and by using soft lighting and appropriate colour palettes also replicate the calmness I experience whenever visiting this ancient but ever-changing forest.

 

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CREDIT: Mike Lloyd ARPS
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I obtained my Licentiate distinction in June 2018, which gave me a huge boost in confidence and, now finally feeling that I could be trusted with my camera to take a reasonable picture, I started looking at the Associate level distinction.

 

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CREDIT: Mike Lloyd ARPS
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I attended a couple of ARPS Advisory days as an observer and I became very enthusiastic about progressing my photography. However, the concept of taking fifteen photographs on a theme filled me with concern - both because of volume and choosing a suitable subject matter – not to mention the small matter that the Statement of Intent had to be written with decent grammar!

I have always been fascinated by woodlands and trees. I have been drawn to the technical challenge of creating some form of order within an often chaotic environment and the shape of trees and the interplay of light and form has always been challenging, but also fascinating.

I then started looking at some wonderful photographs being taken by other experienced woodland photographers and quickly realised that I needed to get up earlier in the morning to capture the best atmosphere. The softness of morning light, mist and foliage were going to be the only way to take those special photographs.

 

 

 

I attended a couple of ARPS Advisory days as an observer and I became very enthusiastic about progressing my photography.

 

 

Taking good pictures on a single theme was difficult enough but the next challenge of making a cohesive panel was equally daunting. I realised that many more pictures than I had originally imagined would be needed in order to achieve that cohesion of different tones, tree shapes and light conditions. In order to reduce the options, I began framing all my photographs in a vertical 5 by 7 format and excluding the sky. I also found that the most cohesive panel did not always include my favourite photographs! From my first library of 40 photographs I chose a panel of 15 (and 5 spares) and headed off to attend an advisory day to get advice on my Woodland scene panel. Whilst the Advisor on that day, Chris Palmer, advised me to submit, he also encouraged me to spend some time on the tonal cohesion - for which I would need more photographs!

From my first library of 40 photographs I chose a panel of 15 (and 5 spares) and headed off to attend an advisory day to get advice on my Woodland scene panel. Whilst the Advisor on that day, Chris Palmer, advised me to submit, he also encouraged me to spend some time on the tonal cohesion - for which I would need more photographs!

From my eventual library of 70 photographs I put together my panel for assessment in October 2018.

I decided to attend the judging day in order to see other panels at this level and was beginning to get very anxious as previous panels were being rejected - even though I thought they were better than mine. I found the judging especially nerve-racking as Paul Mitchell (the well-renowned tree photographer) was a judge!

 

I could not have felt prouder when I passed.

 

 

The photographic journey to ARPS has been exciting, daunting, challenging but also inspiring.

 

 

Looking back at my APRS journey I learnt that:

 

• The Statement of Intent was written as an initial guide but was only finalised after the panel was completed.

• I needed many more photographs than I originally envisaged to complete a cohesive panel.

• Listen to advice; I mean really listen.

• Your panel is ready when you can no longer think of ways of improving it as a cohesive panel.

• Choosing a subject theme that can be found close to home is a huge benefit.

 

This article was first published in the RPS Landscape Magazine, Spring 2020.

 

All images are © Mike Lloyd ARPS

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CREDIT: Mike Lloyd ARPS

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