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Mirror In Mount
CREDIT: Alan Hodgson ASIS HonFRPS

Getting stuck in

Progress on a lockdown project

It is easy to concentrate too much on the completion of a project, and get frustrated because you haven't finished yet. Many of my projects take me years to complete as other stuff gets in the way. I find it important to get satisfaction from completing some of the steps on the way and the joy of just getting stuck in.

My moon camera project got stuck due to pandemic restrictions. Rather than stop it took a different direction, using some scrap materials to allow me to get stuck in. The wine box, log roll and adhesive feet have been reorganised into a functional mirror mount.

This means I can get stuff done on mirror testing. The mirror came from my time in holography and I needed to check on the type of mirror I had. It passed the test - see below.

Problem now is that I have removed all the protective metal from around the delicate mirror. Time to get more stuff done and make a mirror cover.

 

Tech bit

We are used to photographic lenses where the optical axis is straight down the centre of the lens barrel. Some mirrors for holography are purposefully ground with the optical axis off the mirror centre. Useful for holography but a pain for photographic imaging.

The way to distinguish between these types is to take self -portraits of your camera in the mirror and rotate the mirror in between frames, keeping mirror orientation and camera stationary. If it is on axis, the image will remain stationary with rotation.

Fortunately, this mirror turned out to be an on-axis type.